TORNADO INFORMATION YOU SHOULD KNOW!

Welcome to our additional source of information and statistical data on tornadoes for our coverage region! On this page, you can find out if any killer tornadoes happened, where, when, and so on. Their will also be write ups of such storms, including a full synoptic assessment of why the storm(s) occurred. You will also find here, killer tornado statistics (although rare), and extremely large hail and damaging wind (Derecho) events. We consider this information something you may find as useful, even "helpful" in some cases. If you have any questions, comments, or grips, please feel free to contact us.

Regional Monthly Tornado Totals

STATE
2018
2017
2016
2015
DTH 2018
DTH 2017
DTH 2016
DTH 2015
Wisconsin
--
28
16
23
--
00
00
00
Minnesota
--
60
43
24
--
00
00
00
Iowa
--
55
48
55
--
00
00
00
Illinois
--
59
48
56
--
00
00
00
Indiana
--
37
43
31
--
00
00
00
Michigan
--
10
16
24
--
00
00
00
Totals:
--
249
214
213
--
00
00
00

Note: Tornado deaths in the table above are noted by "DTH".

Regional Monthly Killer Tornado Statistics

Number
Date/Time (CDT)
County
State
Deaths
A
B
C
D
Watch
EF Rating
Location
















































































































































Fatalities by state = XX Fatalities by county = XX
							
The following information will describe how to interprete the "Killer Tornadoes" table just above. 

Fatalities by state: This is the total number of tornado related fatalities by state.
Fatalities by county: This is the total number of tornado related fatalities by county.
Fatalities by circumstance: This is the number of fatalities based on circumstances shown below:

A = In a Tornado watch area.
B = In a Severe Thunderstorm watch area.
C = Close to a watch area {15 minutes or 25 miles}.
D = No watch was valid.
F/EF = Original Fujita and Enhanced Fujita tornado intensity scale rating.
H = Inside a house.
M = Inside a mobile home.
O = Engaged in outdoor activity.
P = Inside a permanent building, or similar structure.
V = Inside a vehicle.
? = Unknown circumstance.
WS = A Severe Thunderstorm watch, {Number}.
WT = A Tornado watch, {Number}.

All tornado related fatalities will be entered on the table (above) once they are confirmed by the National Weather Service offices.

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Violent Storm Write-ups:
This section is reserved for the more violent aspect of storms, such as violent tornado or Derecho events which can have huge impacts on society and property. In this section, we'll provide as much information as we can pertaining to the event, including our own synoptic evaluation of what triggered the event, any fatalities, injuries, and estimated damage. If other cities and communities were also impacted, those events too, will be included in this section. Note: Only events which occurs within our coverage region will be included here.
Event Date
State Affected
Type of Event
Summary of Damage*
Valid Headlines**



































Notes:
* The "Summary of Damage" will likely include a link to a separate page which will provide details of the damage left in the wake of the event..
** In the "Valid Headlines" area we'll mention any watches or warnings that were in effect when the event took place.
The extreme weather scenerio!

There is a continued trend in the weather patterns across the lower 48 state region to be less conducive for violent severe weather outbreaks, including violent long track tornadoes and significant Derecho events. This holds true especially across our coverage where such events are rare as it is. But that's not to say that such events have never happened either! In the past few decades, our coverage region has seen it's share of such outbreaks. For instance, the massive July 3rd and 4th Derecho event which swept across Minnesota, Wisconsin into lower Michigan in 1977. That event resulted in 24 million (1977 dollars) damage, 35 injured, and one death. Still another notable event was the 27 April 1984 killer tornado outbreak across Wisconsin. Ten (10) documented tornadoes were reported that day, three (3) of which were killer storms. Three tornadoes touched down in central Wisconsin, where an F-2 tornado ripped across Portage county, south of Stevens Point. In all, 39 people were injured, and three deaths were reported. These are events which happened in Wisconsin only.
Figures 1 and 2 below, shows the cumulative number of violent, tornadoes which have been documented in the coverage region from 1950 to 2006, and from 2006-2016, and the respective trend. Violent tornadoes are considered F-5/EF-5 on the Fujita tornado scale, or enhanced Fujita scale accordingly.

FIG 1

FIG 2

As one can clearly see, the trend for strong to violent tornado activity across our coverage region seems to have dwendled down to only a few reports at best per year from 2000 through 2012. By contrast, the number of strong to violent tornadoes appears much greater from 1950 through 2006, although this covers a 56 year period! There still remains much debate on whether or not the actual trend for such violent storms has in fact lessoned. But judging from the 12 year span from 2000 to 2012, it would appear the trend is torward fewer violent storms. Figures 2-15 (below), are the year by year breakdown of violent tornadoes from 2000 to 2012.


FIG. 2 2000

FIG. 3 2001

FIG. 4 2002

FIG. 5 2003

FIG. 6 2004

FIG. 7 2005

FIG. 8 2006

FIG. 9 2007

FIG. 10 2008

FIG. 11 2009

FIG. 12 2010

FIG. 13 2011

FIG. 14 2012

FIG. 15 Composite

As with tornadoes, other forms of severe weather "extremes" would include very large diameter hail (=> 2 inches in diameter), and extremely damaging winds (Derecho events). While lightning is a serious hazard, and has already caused numerous deaths, it does not really fit into the severe weather category. Extremes with large hail and Derecho events are fairly rare across our coverage region, although they have occurred. In the table below (figures 15-16), these wind and hail events are summed up with composite graphics which span the period from 2000 to 2012. Again, these composites illustrate only the extremes of both hazards.


FIG. 15 Hail Composite

FIG. 16 Derecho Composite

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